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Indigenous Education Resource Library

The Assembly of Catholic Bishops of Ontario created the Institute for Catholic Education (ICE) to coordinate the work of Catholic Associations and organizations in writing Catholic curriculum within the parameters established by the Ministry of Education. The seven partner organizations and associations who constitute ICE have commissioned this database to assist Catholic educators to respond to the Calls to Action that relate to education within the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report, and to current and emerging initiatives of the Ministry of Education with respect to Indigenous education.

These are important areas to address through curriculum in Ontario’s Catholic schools. Our mandate is to create and/or identify resources appropriate for use in Catholic schools, and to support teachers to address the curriculum through the lens of gospel values and our faith tradition, reflecting the distinctive nature and mandate of our Catholic schools.

This ICE initiative undertakes to produce and facilitate the distribution of resources that will effectively support efforts to address these issues within Catholic schools. Catholic educators wishing to identify, recommend or to contribute additional Indigenous education resources are invited to submit appropriate content by contacting indigenouseducation@iceont.ca

Search Result for: ecology

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  • What Our Elders Say…

    Description: This resource highlights the importance of the oral history of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Many of these stories are incorporated to teach about biodiversity, ecology and natural relationships within the environment. Drama is used to make curriculum connections to Life Science, Habitats and Communities, and Language Arts. This follows a tradition that existed for thousands of years as knowledge passed from one generation to the next through basic survival skills and lessons learned through observing and living with nature. This traditional way of life serves as a foundation for learning and making applications that incorporates timeless wisdom and knowledge.

    URL: http://www.abca.on.ca/downloads/GC_what_the_Elders_Say.pdf?phpMyAdmin=fa638e549ab1e05917617e02161cad78%20(***problem-BOS)

    Keywords: Habitats and Communities, Language Arts, Drama, Sciences, Biodiversity

    Resilience in Pre-contact Pacific Northwest Social Ecological Systems

    Description: If like other ecosystems, the variable and dynamic ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest exhibited cycles and unpredictable behavior, particularly when humans were present, the indigenous societies of that region had to have been resilient in order to persist for such a long time. They persisted for two millennia prior to contact with people from the “old world.” The Resilience Alliance (2002) proposes that social and ecological resilience requires three abilities: the ability to buffer, the ability to self-organize, and the ability to learn. This paper suggests that the characteristics of the potlatch system among Indians on the Northwest Coast, namely property rights, environmental ethics, rules of earning and holding titles, public accountability, and the reciprocal exchange system, provided all three required abilities. The resulting resilience of these societies confirms the validity of many of the ideas now being discussed as important components in providing successful and sustainable relationships between humans and their ecosystems. That so many separate ideas seem to have been linked together into resilient systems in the Pacific Northwest suggests that social ecological resilience is complicated.

    URL: https://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol7/iss3/art6/

    Keywords: The Resilience Alliance, Socialization, Ecosystem, environmental ethics, property rights